You probably drive next to big rigs and other large commercial trucks on a daily basis. It seems like there are more and more large trucks on our roads. Although they are necessary for delivering the products we purchase at stores, they are also intimidating to drive near. This is because they are huge and hard to see around, they weight a lot, and they have large blind spots that make it hard for truck drivers to see smaller cars. However, these aren’t the only things that should be a worry to drivers on the road.

Three Truck Vehicle Concerns

According to truckinginfo.com, there are three top vehicle CSA violations that are of concern. CSA is the government’s Compliance, Safety, and Accountability program, and the CSA program is conducted by roadside inspectors. These concerns and violations by truck drivers and the trucking industry can lead to truck crashes, injuries and fatalities. Here are the three common truck vehicle violations:

  1. Truck lighting. When a truck is missing a reflector or has a broken light, it is a huge concern because other drivers might not see the truck. According to truckinginfo.com, 28 percent of roadside vehicle violations last year involved trucks with broken lights or reflective materials. Truck drivers and maintenance crews for the trucking company should be inspecting every light and reflector on the truck to make sure they are in proper working order, and truck drivers should be inspecting their trucks before every trip they make and after every trip. In fact, truck drivers should carry spare light bulbs and fuses so they never have to cause a crash due to their rig’s poor lighting.
  2. Truck brakes. Every driver needs their brakes to be working properly, especially truck drivers who have to bring large trucks that weigh a lot to a complete stop. When brakes aren’t acting how they should, a catastrophic truck accident might be the end result. Although truck drivers are supposed to inspect their brakes before and after every trip, sometimes they aren’t fully trained to know what to look for or how to fix the problem. This is why there were over one million brake violations last year in roadside inspections, according to truckinginfo.com.
  3. Truck tires. Just like it is critical to have brakes in good working order, it is essential that bad tires aren’t on semis. When tires are bald or don’t have enough tread depth, a truck can fail to stop or perform how the driver needs it to. Unfortunately, some truck drivers fail to notice their bad tires or replace them in a timely manner. According to truckinginfo.com, 11 percent of roadside inspection violations were for tires – with half of those violations due to tread depth. Truck drivers need to be reminded that steer tires need 4/32 inch of tread depth and other tires need 2/32 inch of tread depth, and they should be inspecting their tires before and after every trip.

What You Should Know About Trucking Accidents

If you believe the truck wreck you were involved in was due to a truck’s poor brakes, bad tires, or missing lights, you need to speak with a lawyer immediately. Your attorney can gather evidence to support the truck driver and trucking company was negligent and at fault for your crash. Contact the Law Offices of David Benenfeld at 866-9 HELP NOW or 866-943-5766 for a free consultation with a skilled South Florida accident attorney today.