How much space do you need?

Broward County drivers vary in how much space they require between their car and another to feel reasonably safe. Drivers who follow too closely are labeled obnoxious tailgaters, while those who lag behind are blamed for holding up traffic. Road rage is to blame for many tailgating occurrences. If a driver has a need for speed, is particularly impatient or just plain angry, tailgating is often a driver’s first line of attack.

Still, some tailgaters aren’t always aware that they are following too closely. What one driver perceives as allowing for safe distance between their bumper and the driver’s in front, may be seen as aggressive by others. Confident in their ability to brake or turn away quickly, countless drivers drive closely without trying to show aggression whatsoever.

Despite the space drivers feel they need between their bumper and another’s, research continues to reflect what we already know. Tailgating causes serious accidents, even fatalities. In fact, reports show that tailgating is a contributing factor in one-third of all auto accidents.

Tailgating radically shortens the time required to react in order to prevent a serious accident. The DMV suggests allowing a space cushion between the four sides of your car and others in order to drive with precaution. Below is a description of various rules that are recommended to prevent against auto accidents caused by tailgating.

Tailgating “Rules”

Rules about tailgating are all about how well you can stop. The DMV explains that assuming you have good tires, good brakes, and dry pavement, then at 55 mph it takes 400 feet to react and bring the vehicle to a complete stop. Remember, a football field measures 360 feet, including the two end zones.

  •  2-Second Rule. One Mississippi. Two Mississippi. Keep 2 seconds between you and the car in front of you. Gauge this by using a street sign. Once the front car passes the sign, start counting. In theory, there should be 2 seconds between you and the car in front. This doesn’t usually work. Why not? If the driver in front slams on their brakes, then it will take you far longer than 2 measly seconds to stop the length of a football field.
  • 4-Second Rule. Anything short of 4 seconds between you and the driver ahead is unsafe. Four seconds will allow the driver to brake safely, in a perfect world. Research reveals drastic vision differences in drivers and perceived threat when it comes to the consequences of tailgating.

If you have been involved in a Broward County auto accident that involved tailgating, it is highly likely that you sustained serious injuries from a life threatening experience. It is important to talk with an experienced South Florida Auto Accident Attorney that understands specific injuries sustained from accidents. Contact the offices of David M. Benenfeld. We can help you prepare your paperwork to get the results you are looking for.