Only 1% of our world’s population suffers from schizophrenia.

Now, if you belong to the other 99% that does not have schizophrenia, then that 1% statistic might not seem personally relevant to you. However, for the other 51 million people diagnosed with schizophrenia, and the families that take care of them, the disorder may become absolutely debilitating.

Schizophrenia is medically defined as a mental disorder that manifests symptoms such as: hallucinations, paranoia, delusions, disorganized speech and thinking, and significant social and occupational dysfunction.  Sadly, schizophrenia is chronic, and typically worsens with age.

Causes of Schizophrenia

  1. Genetics – Over 10% of those diagnosed with schizophrenia, also have a family member diagnosed with a mental disorder.
  2. Environment – Exposure to viruses, malnutrition during early childhood, and problems at birth.
  3. Brain – Imbalances in chemical reactions in the brain, less grey matter, and larger ventricles.

 

Treatment for Schizophrenia

  1. Antipsychotic Medications – Thorazine, Haldol, and Clorazine are typical meds that doctors use to control the symptoms for schizophrenia. Unfortunately, most patients report complicated side effects from these meds such as tremors, rigidity, and muscle spasms.
  2. Psychosocial Treatments – Illness management, controlling typical drug and alcohol abuse, vocational training, and therapy.

 

If you are a friend or family member of someone diagnosed with schizophrenia, you may find it comforting to know that Social Security disability benefits are available to individuals whose inability to function impacts their job performance.

 

Social Security will need to determine if in fact the schizophrenic symptoms are impacting the individual’s ability to work. This part of the process can be very difficult to prove. In this case, it will be helpful for a qualified Social Security disability attorney to help process your case.

 

A person diagnosed with schizophrenia may find it impossible to work but completely unaware of his or her own symptoms and need for help. If you know someone with schizophrenia who is unable to work, he or she may be eligible for Social Security benefits in South Florida.

Contact the Law Offices of David Benenfeld for a free legal consultation to determine if you have a case. Call [number type=”2″] or [number type=”1″].