ADHD is a medical neurological disorder effecting children and adults.

Florida residents diagnosed with ADHD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, are in restless pursuit of learning how to manage life due to their difficulty with attention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. 

Over 5 million American children are diagnosed with ADHD, and half of those kids are taking prescription medication. Because over 60% of children continue with ADHD symptoms through their adulthood, a whopping 8 million American adults are also currently diagnosed.

Because ADHD is so widespread and seemingly subjective, almost everyone has an opinion. Probably one of the largest misconceptions is that it is a poorly termed label to excuse lazy behavior and poor parenting. However, brain scans of ADHD patients reflect abnormal functioning of brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. These individual nerve pathways don’t properly regulate behavior.

Adult ADHD Symptoms

  • Chronic forgetfulness
  • Always running late
  • Problems getting organized
  • Employment problems
  • Anger management
  • Procrastination
  • Impulsivity
  • Anxiety

ADHD in the Workplace

ADHD has a dramatic effect in a person’s job performance and work environment. Florida employees often miss deadlines and don’t complete work on time, which makes it hard to keep a job. Some individuals try to compensate in other ways to disguise their frustrations, while others may find it difficult getting through a workday without exploding at a coworker.

In today’s job force, having ADHD is a huge disadvantage for getting a job, and most likely, performing well after getting the job. It’s also common for individuals with ADHD to develop sleep problems, depression, and overall moodiness.

Social Security Criteria for ADHD

To qualify for Social Security benefits, it is essential that the ADHD individual prove that he or she is unable to work. The Social Security Administration (SSA) will require the following criteria in reviewing your case:

  1. Psychologist/psychiatrist reports showing ADHD history of your treatment.
  2. Medical records documenting different types of meds and therapies.
  3. Employers should provide testimony to show history of how ADHD affected your ability to work.
  4. Academic records from your childhood or college showing difficulty in school performance.
  5. Detailed written testimony from psychologist, stating details of current treatment and recommendation that you are unable to work.

To assist in the accuracy of your Social Security claim for ADHD, it is important to talk with an experienced South Florida Social Security disability attorney. Your attorney can help you prepare your paperwork to get the results you are looking for. Contact the Law Offices of David M. Benenfeld for answers to your questions. Initial consultation is free.