There are many risky jobs at hotels and resorts, and elevator work is one of the dangerous types of jobs. Although elevator work is often contracted out to professionals, accidents and injuries do occur involving elevators at hotels and resorts. Sadly, a fatal elevator accident at Tradewinds Island Resort, located on St. Pete Beach, claimed the life of a 45-year-old worker last year.

Mark Allen Johnson, of Tampa, was crushed to death when the elevator he was working on fell on him. An employee of SWS Environmental (who was subcontracted for the job), Johnson was cleaning out the bottom of the elevator shaft when the elevator fell on him. According to reports, he had been working for approximately 40 minutes before the elevator fell from the second floor—crushing him to death.

After an investigation by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), both SWS Environmental and the resort are facing more than $80,000 in fines as a result of the fatal elevator accident. According to OSHA, there were several safety violations that occurred. Mainly, the power to the elevator was not completely shut off before work began on the elevator—a safety procedure both SWS and the resort should know about and follow.

After this investigation, it was revealed the SWS had received previous safety violations, and that Johnson was not a certified elevator technician. Although this Florida elevator accident was a rare deadly accident, some elevator accidents result in serious and disabling injuries.

When elevator workers are injured or killed in accidents, they and their families deserve to receive compensation. If you have been injured in an elevator accident on the job in Florida, you may have rights to workers’ compensation benefits or wrongful death benefits. Make sure that you receive the maximum benefits you are entitled to and speak with a knowledgeable South Florida workers’ comp attorney before doing anything else. Call the Law Office of David Benenfeld for a free consultation at [number type=”2″] or [number type=”1″].